Deeper Into Jeopardy! XVII: A Brief History of Time – $1200

Jeopardy! category: A BRIEF HISTORY OF TIME (05-05-2014)

$1200 clue: An 1884 conference chose the meridian of this facility’s transit instrument as the “prime” starting point for time zones

Correct response

The gist: The Prime Meridian, of course, also known as 0° longitude, is where the modern system of 24 time zones begins.  Continue reading

Deeper Into Jeopardy! XVII: A Brief History of Time – $800

Jeopardy! category: A BRIEF HISTORY OF TIME (05-05-2014)

$800 clue: This 18th century German’s “critique” of time? It’s “phenomenally real” but “noumenally unreal”

Correct response

The gist: We humans live in the phenomenal world, which is to say that it’s composed of what our minds experience, not that it’s really, really cool.  Continue reading

Deeper Into Jeopardy! XVII: A Brief History of Time – $400

This past week was the semi-finals quarter finals of the Battle of the Decades, so once again the difficulty’s been ramped up to at least try to challenge the contestants. This week we’ll look at A Brief History of Time, but not Stephen Hawking’s book, just sort of generally.

Jeopardy! category: A BRIEF HISTORY OF TIME (05-05-2014)

$400 clue: In 1687 this Brit differentiated “absolute, true, and mathematical time” & “relative, apparent, and common time”

Correct response

The gist: This was two and a half centuries (of relative time, that is) before Einstein came to a similar conclusion.  Continue reading

Deeper Into Jeopardy! XVI: A Polk – $2000

Jeopardy! category: A POLK (28-04-2014)

$2000 clue: Polk’s presidential campaign slogan was this numerical phrase, referring to the Oregon territory boundary dispute

Correct response

The gist: It isn’t one of the most well-known of latitudinal parallels (like the equator, the Arctic circle, or the 49th), but it certainly had its historical importance.  Continue reading

Deeper Into Jeopardy! XVI: A Polk – $400

It’s just impossible to resist, and silly to ignore, when the writers offer up a full category on a U.S. President (you’ll recall, I hope, that this entire series began with Obama-Rama), since the Prezzes are well up there on the list of most important topics for a Jeopardy! contestant. So, we’ll take up the writers’ offer with last Monday’s Double Jeopardy! category A Polk (paired on the show with its preceding category A Pig), about Big Number 11, James K. Polk, president from 1845-1849.

Jeopardy! category: A POLK (28-04-2014)

$400 clue: Because of his devotion & support to this former president, James K. Polk was nicknamed “Young Hickory”

Correct response

The gist: He was nicknamed “Old Hickory” because his soldiers said he was tough as the tree’s wood (and the switches made from it), and his personal history bears this out – among other things, he was an enthusiastic dueler, and even let lawyer Charles Dickinson lodge a bullet in his chest before taking careful aim and killing his opponent (the bullet remained in his chest for the rest of his life).  Continue reading

Deeper Into Jeopardy! XV: Colleges, not Universities – $2000

Jeopardy! category: COLLEGES, NOT UNIVERSITIES (22-04-2014)

$2000 clue: This school in the “central” part of Vermont was the first American college to grant a bachelor’s degree to a black student

Correct response

The gist: The free-born and excellently-named Alexander Lucius Twillight matriculated in 1823 with a baccalaureate degree, the first African American to do so.  Continue reading