Deeper Into Jeopardy! IX: Native Americans – $400

Well, two weeks plus a day’s worth of Jeopardy! recordings is surely enough to tire anyone out, and it seemed to finally get to no-longer-champion Arthur Chu, who was defeated this past Wednesday by Diana Peloquin. It seemed to me that Chu wasn’t his usual self – he seemed to be showing much less discipline on the buzzer, both not getting in before the others as much as he usually did and giving more incorrect responses. But anyway, I don’t think anyone would be upset with being a 12-day champion, racking up almost $300 000 dollars, and getting a spot in the next Tournament of Champions, but big congratulations to Diana – “defeated Arthur Chu” is definitely a nice by-line for any Jeopardy! fan. Now it remains to be seen whether Arthur’s strategy will have a lasting effect on the game, or if we’ll be back to the standard top-to-bottom play. Either way, this week we’ll be taking a look at a Double Jeopardy! category from Arthur’s final game, Native Americans, which gave quite a bit of trouble to all three contestants.

Jeopardy! category: THE LAST CENTURY (03-04-2014)

$400 clue: Her descendants through her son Thomas Rolfe number in the tens of thousands

Correct response

The gist: She’s a mainstay of American folklore, a figure of rampant historical revisionism and romantic projection, and, along with Mulan, Jasmine, and Tiana, one of the four non-white Disney Princesses. Continue reading

Deeper Into Jeopardy! VIII: The Last Century – $2000

Jeopardy! category: THE LAST CENTURY (03-04-2014)

$2000 clue: In 1924 Wyoming made her the first woman elected governor of a U.S. state

Correct response

The gist: On October 4, 1924, the Democratic governor of Wyoming, a lawyer from Tennessee who had lost several political races before being elected governor, died after a botched appendectomy. The Wyoming Democrats, looking for someone to run in a special election in his stead, opted for the governor’s widow. Continue reading

Deeper Into Jeopardy! VIII: The Last Century – $1600

Jeopardy! category: THE LAST CENTURY (03-04-2014)

$1600 clue: The nationalist party, which came to power in China in the 1920s, was also called this, KMT for short

Correct response

The gist: Usually known in English as the Chinese Nationalist Party (but translating more like the “Chinese National People’s Party”), the current ruling party of Taiwan has been in power in that country for all but eight years (200-2008) since the founding of the Nationalist Government in the late 1920’s in Nanjing. The Kuomintang, as it is known in Chinese (and English transliteration), was officially founded in 1911, shortly after its predecessor the Revolutionary Alliance succeeded in overthrowing the Qing (pronounced “shing” or “ching”), the last royal Chinese dynasty. Led by Sun Yat-sen, the KMT’s political power quickly faded under the influence of warlords, and retained control only of a small part of southern China. It expanded again under Yat-sen’s friend, ally, and successor Chiang Kai-shek, who led as Chairman of the ruling party for eight years and of the National Military Council for 15 until 1948. That year, the raging Chinese Civil War saw the People’s Liberation Army of Mao Zedong chase Chiang Kai-shek and his Nationalist allies to the island of Taiwan. From there, they continued to claim jurisdiction over mainland China while Mao’s People’s Republic of China did the same over Taiwan, a relationship which continues under the name “the One-China policy.” Officially, both the PRC and the KMT consider their laws to apply to the entirety of the entity they consider China, but generally acknowledge that they lack the power to enforce those laws outside of their controlled territory. The current leader of the KMT and President of Taiwan (or the Republic of China), Ma Ying-jeou, resumed office in 2008. He has stated that while his party officially seeks the unification of Taiwan and China, they “don’t have a timetable” for the process.

The clue: Not an easy question, but certainly helped quite a bit by giving the initials. It may be that more people would be able to name the KMT by their initials but not by their Chinese name – asking for only the tougher of the two makes it a good $1600 clue, but one that might be a $2000 in a non-tournament game. Interestingly, the clue doesn’t mention any of the KMT’s more recent history. Maybe the writers didn’t want to drag the clue into the 21st century, given the category.

In Jeopardy!: The Kuomintang (not the KMT) appears in seven clues in the J!Archive, but this is the first that asked for the name of the party rather than using the party to contextualize something else. Three of the clues look for Chiang Kai-shek (as a military leader both before and during WWII), one for Taiwan, and one for Sun Yat-sen (as the party’s founder). The final clue asks for Tianenmen Square, where Mao founded the PRC after defeating the Kuomintang in the Civil War.

Deeper Into Jeopardy! VIII: The Last Century – $800

Jeopardy! category: THE LAST CENTURY (03-04-2014)

$800 clue: In 1989 Ayatollah Khomeini called this book blasphemous & condemned Salman Rushdie, its author, to death

Correct response

The gist: The book certainly never presented itself as anything but a fantastical story – in the very first scene, two men are transformed into an archangel and a devil after their plane explodes. Continue reading

Deeper Into Jeopardy! VIII: The Last Century – $400

This past week was the second installment of the Battle of the Decades tournament, this time with the greatest champions available from the 1990’s vying for their place in the finals. With the show closing out its own twentieth century history for the time being, I thought it appropriate to take on its category concerning that very century from Monday, March 3rd, and brush up on our relatively recent history.

Jeopardy! category: THE LAST CENTURY (03-04-2014)

$400 clue: “The most trusted man in America”, he ended his tenure as anchor of the CBS Evening News in 1981

Correct response

The gist: “And that’s the way it is,” he said countless times after finishing the broadcast between 1952 and March 6, 1981, when fellow newsman Dan Rather took over his position.  Continue reading

Deeper Into Jeopardy! VII: Photography – $2000

Jeopardy! category: PHOTOGRAPHY (28-02-2014)

$2000 clue: This photojournalism magazine debuted on Nov. 23, 1936 with a cover photo of Fort Peck Dam, then being built

Correct response

The gist: Fort Peck, Montana was a “government town,” founded as part of FDR’s New Deal and the Public Works Administration to house the newly-employed builders of the Fort Peck Dam nearby on the Missouri River. Continue reading

Deeper Into Jeopardy! VII: Photography – $1600

Jeopardy! category: PHOTOGRAPHY (28-02-2014)

$1600 clue: To rate film speed, ASA has largely been replaced by this other 3-letter designation with “S” in the middle

Correct response

The gist: Ask most any photographer what makes a good picture, and the first thing they’ll say is light. Of course, this makes sense, given that all a camera does is take in light and record it, either chemically on film or digitally with a sensor. To take a good picture, you need to match the light to the camera, or the camera to the light. Continue reading

Deeper Into Jeopardy! VII: Photography – $1200

Jeopardy! category: PHOTOGRAPHY (28-02-2014)

$1200 clue: In 1927 he became the official trip photographer of the Sierra Club

Correct response

The gist: His family had lost their comfortable lifestyle after his grandfather died and some relatives sold their shares, and a controlling interest, of the family lumber company to Hawaiian interests. But his father had taught him to live by the teachings of American poet Ralph Waldo Emerson, and to find happiness in simple things and respect for nature. Continue reading

Deeper Into Jeopardy! VII: Photography – $800

Jeopardy! category: PHOTOGRAPHY (28-02-2014)

$800 clue: In 1929 this 2-word phrase was coined for Erich Salomon’s spontaneous photo technique, later used by Allen Funt

Correct response

The gist: What better reason to go through your day with a smile on your face? If you were an accused killer on trial in a German court in 1927, you might have been unknowingly (and illegally) posing for Erich Salomon’s lens cleverly (and hilariously) concealed inside his bowler hat. Continue reading